Why does crime occur? Why do statistics show us that although only 10% of the population are left-handed, 33% of criminals with multiple arrests are left-handed? This fascinating subject sees you exploring the different types of crime and researching criminal cases. You will debate how criminal activity should be punished and tackled.

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Must meet the A level general entry criteria (specifically two GCSEs at grade 5 and one of the grade 5s must be in either GCSE English Language or Literature, but GCSE English Language should not be lower than a grade 4

The topics you will study will see you exploring how the social construct of crime is different all around the world. Key topics include:

• Changing awareness of crime

• Criminological theories

• Crime scene to courtroom

• Crime and punishment

This is a fast paced and inspiring course which will allow you to look in-depth at key criminal cases. You will explore personal and social reasons why certain crimes go unreported and look at the consequence of unreported crime in relation to crime statistics and legal changes. As part of your experience, you will attend a special event held in College with rehabilitated former offenders to hear about their experiences of the prison system and the circumstances that led them to crime in the first place. 

Assessment for this WJEC Examined Applied Diploma is via 50% examination and 50% controlled assessment. Each year you will complete two units. One unit is assessed via a 1.5 hour exam, the other via an internally controlled assessment. This is 8 hours long and will require you to produce a written report linked to a crime scenario.

This WJEC Examined Applied Diploma supports a fantastic range of progression routes, including degrees in Criminology, Sociology and Law and careers with the Police and Forensic Sciences. Your learning will see you being inspired about a wide range of possibilities!

Good to Know

The word “criminology” was first used in the 1850s, and first taught in universities in 1890. It comes from the Latin “crimen,” which means crime in a judicial processing sense, and the Greek word “logos,” which means reason or study.